official-nhl:

The above is Patrick Kane stickhandling. 

The below gif is Brandon Bollig’s response to Kane’s stickhandling.

I don’t know what I’m doing.

I’m ill

Ill me

this dude tho….

this dude tho….

everything got worse

I thought I was on to something there but evidently no.

Okay the opening sequence played fine but as soon as I got into the actual game the frame rate dropped off and now everything sounds like some sort of ketamine nightmare.

heeeee wwwiiilllll sssiiiggnnnaaallll ttthhheee ddddrraaaagggooonnnssss.

Oh toil and trouble

Just spent the past 2 hours trying to get Mortal Kombat Armageddon to work on here and FINALLY it is done.

I’m so excited I don’t even care about the slightly laggy frame rate which will no doubt cause me to lose every fight.

I should have got deception first but whatever.

BLAZE BETTER WATCH THE FUCK OUT

Bradford

And all that’s in this tag are pictures of Zayn Malik interspersed with pictures of the town hall…… Where’s all the polythene stuck in trees?
Where are the slums? I feel Bradford is very misrepresented. If I had a camera worth using I’d change this.

I really like this song

limmynem:

Did You Know… 
Some frogs can remain alive while being in a frozen state? 
To call wood frogs hardy would be an understatement. The species (Rana sylvatica) can survive winter temperatures that freeze up to two-thirds of the water in their bodies. They endure this annual popsicle phase with help from cryoprotectants, substances circulating in their blood that lower the freezing point of their body fluids. New research shows that frogs at the northern limits of the species’ range are uniquely adapted to freezing. A team of zoologists collected wood frogs near Fairbanks, Alaska, and froze them to -16°C—a temperature that would kill frogs of the same species living in the midwestern United States. When the creatures still managed to reanimate after thawing, the team looked for physical qualities that might explain this superior resilience. It found that the Alaskan frogs stockpile astonishing amounts of a complex sugar called glycogen in their livers, which grow 1.5-fold relative to body mass as the amphibians prepare for winter. “This frog is like a walking liver,” says zoologist Jon Costanzo of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, who led the research. The liver later converts this glycogen to glucose, a known cryoprotectant that quickly gets distributed to all the cells in the body when temperatures drop. The Alaskan frogs also accumulated about three times as much of the cryoprotectant urea in their blood plasma compared with  frogs collected in Ohio, the team reports online today in The Journal of Experimental Biology. A third substance, whose identity is still mysterious, was present in Alaskan frogs, but not Ohioan ones. Costanzo and his team are on the case. [via]

limmynem:

Did You Know… 

Some frogs can remain alive while being in a frozen state? 

To call wood frogs hardy would be an understatement. The species (Rana sylvatica) can survive winter temperatures that freeze up to two-thirds of the water in their bodies. They endure this annual popsicle phase with help from cryoprotectants, substances circulating in their blood that lower the freezing point of their body fluids. New research shows that frogs at the northern limits of the species’ range are uniquely adapted to freezing. A team of zoologists collected wood frogs near Fairbanks, Alaska, and froze them to -16°C—a temperature that would kill frogs of the same species living in the midwestern United States. When the creatures still managed to reanimate after thawing, the team looked for physical qualities that might explain this superior resilience. It found that the Alaskan frogs stockpile astonishing amounts of a complex sugar called glycogen in their livers, which grow 1.5-fold relative to body mass as the amphibians prepare for winter. “This frog is like a walking liver,” says zoologist Jon Costanzo of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, who led the research. The liver later converts this glycogen to glucose, a known cryoprotectant that quickly gets distributed to all the cells in the body when temperatures drop. The Alaskan frogs also accumulated about three times as much of the cryoprotectant urea in their blood plasma compared with  frogs collected in Ohio, the team reports online today in The Journal of Experimental Biology. A third substance, whose identity is still mysterious, was present in Alaskan frogs, but not Ohioan ones. Costanzo and his team are on the case. [via]

well these credits are unusual

Dunno how the fuck I pulled this off without breaking everything I own.

Dunno how the fuck I pulled this off without breaking everything I own.